Remember in Duncan

Remember in DuncanThis is a snapshot from a Facebook group thread named ‘Remember in Duncan’ – it took off like a rocket up to more than 4,000 members seemingly overnight. The admin was gracious enough to suggest I may copy anything they have but I like this idea better. If you see something you like you may click through to the group via your Facebook account.

Lots of stories from the past and photos you won’t find anywhere else. If you want to try this Facebook Feed on your website, use the link to the right for a version to test drive.

 

Going through recipes, I found two written on the back of these IBM cards. My first real job was in Data Processing at the main building in Bois D'arc in the basement. 1966 and I started work for $1.38 an hour, which was double my salary as a soda jerk at Duncan's Drug. The machine we key punched (data entry) on was an 0-29 I believe, when we used these cards. There was a drum that you put one of these cards on that was called a "program" card. See the tiny numbers at the bottom? Those are the columns. The program card for whatever you were punching; payroll, accounts receivable, accounts payable, warehouse, material tickets, purchase orders, shop orders, warehouse stock, etc., stopped in the columns you were to punch a little square hole in for the big old computers in the ice cold computer room to read and print out on that green and white computer paper. Later, after having a baby and returning to work, we had better, faster machines. We punched onto a disk. Easier, quieter and faster. Also, better on the eyes! I loved working there-time flew! Plus it was very interesting. You had to quit work when you were pregnant back then. Also had to wear dresses to work. I was working there when Go-go boots were a big deal and we loved them because at least a part of your leg would be warmer. A few friends and would skate on the ice in the parking lot at lunch when there weren't very many cars there!
As I am writing this I realize younger people won't have a clue what I am talking about!
... See MoreSee Less

Going through recipes, I found two written on the back of these IBM cards. My first real job was in Data Processing at the main building in Bois Darc in the basement. 1966 and I started work for $1.38 an hour, which was double my salary as a soda jerk at Duncans Drug. The machine we key punched (data entry) on was an 0-29 I believe, when we used these cards. There was a drum that you put one of these cards on that was called a program card. See the tiny numbers at the bottom? Those are the columns. The program card for whatever you were punching; payroll, accounts receivable, accounts payable, warehouse, material tickets, purchase orders, shop orders, warehouse stock, etc., stopped in the columns you were to punch a little square hole in for the big old computers in the ice cold computer room to read and print out on that green and white computer paper. Later, after having a baby and returning to work, we had better, faster machines. We punched onto a disk. Easier, quieter and faster. Also, better on the eyes! I loved working there-time flew! Plus it was very interesting. You had to quit work when you were pregnant back then. Also had to wear dresses to work. I was working there when Go-go boots were a big deal and we loved them because at least a part of your leg would be warmer. A few friends and would skate on the ice in the parking lot at lunch when there werent very many cars there! 
   As I am writing this I realize younger people wont have a clue what I am talking about!

Denise Gordon Kuehn, Maggie Dean Hoyle and 23 others like this

View previous comments

Toney HearellI know what you are talking about, but I'm not younger lol.

2 days ago

3 Replies

Avatar

Heather Nicole MooreI have no clue what you are talking about but super interesting lol

2 days ago
Avatar

Gayle ArmstrongI know exactly what you're talking about.

2 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Sandy HodgesI worked at city hall on a billing machine that used similar cards! My neck and back were so achy at the end of the day. This was in the early 60's.

2 days ago   ·  1

4 Replies

Avatar

Shirley Guymon BransonI worked for OG&E in OK City after 1st semester at OSU my sophomore year. We used the same type of cards!

2 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Jack SylvesterOn the old Atlas missile system we used a system called Apche to do system test. It used plastic punch card that had to be hand punched if one got cracked. What a pain.

2 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Koenia O'ConnorI did that too at Fort Sill.

2 days ago   ·  1

2 Replies

Avatar

Chris CubaLinda Cuba Harbin

2 days ago
Avatar

Raymond KapingFrom Wikipedia Herman Hollerith invented the recording of data on a medium that could then be read by a machine. Prior uses of machine readable media, such as those above (other than Korsakov, Fenby and Carpentier), had been for control, not data. "After some initial trials with paper tape, he settled on punched cards...", developing punched card data processing technology for the 1890 US census. Hollerith founded the Tabulating Machine Company (1896) which was one of four companies that were amalgamated (via stock acquisition) to form a fifth company, Computing-Tabulating-Recording Company (CTR), later renamed International Business Machines Corporation (IBM). Other companies entering the punched card business included The Tabulator Limited (1902) later renamed the British Tabulating Machine Company Limited, Deutsche Hollerith-Maschinen Gesellschaft mbH (Dehomag) (1911), Powers Accounting Machine Company (1911), Remington Rand (1927), and Groupe Bull (1931).[13] These companies, and others, manufactured and marketed a variety of punched cards and unit record machines for creating, sorting, and tabulating punched cards, even after the development of electronic computers in the 1950s. Both IBM and Remington Rand tied punched card purchases to machine leases, a violation of the 1914 Clayton Antitrust Act. In 1932, the US government took both to court on this issue. Remington Rand settled quickly. IBM viewed its business as providing a service and that the cards were part of the machine. IBM fought all the way to the Supreme Court and lost in 1936; the court ruling that IBM could only set card specifications. "By 1937... IBM had 32 presses at work in Endicott, N.Y., printing, cutting and stacking five to 10 million punched cards every day."[16] Punched cards were even used as legal documents, such as U.S. Government checks and savings bonds. During WW II punched card equipment was used by the Allies in some of their efforts to decrypt Axis communications. See, for example, Central Bureau. At Bletchley Park 2,000,000 punched cards were used each week for storing decrypted German messages.[18] A mobile Hollerith (BTM) installation was landed on the Normandy beaches on D-Day plus six. Punched card technology developed into a powerful tool for business data-processing. By 1950 punched cards had become ubiquitous in industry and government. "Do not fold, spindle or mutilate," a generalized version of the warning that appeared on some punched cards (generally on those distributed as paper documents to be later returned for further machine processing, checks for example), became a motto for the post-World War II era. In 1955 IBM signed a consent decree requiring, amongst other things, that IBM would by 1962 have no more than one-half of the punched card manufacturing capacity in the United States. Tom Watson Jr.'s decision to sign this decree, where IBM saw the punched card provisions as the most significant point, completed the transfer of power to him from Thomas Watson, Sr. The UNITYPER introduced magnetic tape for data entry in the 1950s. During the 1960s, the punched card was gradually replaced as the primary means for data storage by magnetic tape, as better, more capable computers became available. Mohawk Data Sciences introduced a magnetic tape encoder in 1965, a system marketed as a keypunch replacement which was somewhat successful. Punched cards were still commonly used for entering both data and computer programs until the mid-1980s when the combination of lower cost magnetic disk storage, and affordable interactive terminals on less expensive minicomputers made punched cards obsolete for these roles as well. However, their influence lives on through many standard conventions and file formats. The terminals that replaced the punched cards, the IBM 3270 for example, displayed 80 columns of text in text mode, for compatibility with existing software. Some programs still operate on the convention of 80 text columns, although fewer and fewer do as newer systems employ graphical user interfaces with variable-width type fonts.

2 days ago   ·  3

3 Replies

Avatar

Linda Sue Collier BakerI worked at Halliburton in Data Processing for almost five years from 1964 to 1968.....got pregnant in 1968 and had to quit. I loved working there in the old basement. Remember the old 029 machine and these paper cards. I loved it. Thanks for the reminder...... :-) We must have worked together. Burnis Sanner was my boss.

2 days ago   ·  3

4 Replies

Avatar

Ron SmithProbably we have all seen/heard the "Player Piano" . It was invented in 1863. I've always wondered if that invention somehow played a part in the invention of punch card data processing computers? The basic idea is the same.

2 days ago   ·  3

2 Replies

Avatar

Karla Thompson MarkleI also did key punch at Security National Bank. Had good times there. Every check was put on those cards.

2 days ago   ·  3

2 Replies

Avatar

Chris CubaLinda Harbin

2 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Kae Kae WisdomI work in Data Processing in the 70's. Did the cards & floppy disks. Fun times at the flying H.

2 days ago   ·  2

9 Replies

Avatar

Mary Kathryn Spurgin CookBetty, I understood all of it. I'm older than you 🙂

2 days ago
Avatar

Brent SannerMy Dad was in charge of the Data Processing department at Halliburton for a very long time...I actually got to help on the "verify" machine occasionally.

2 days ago   ·  3

1 Reply

Avatar

Tony R SimmsI'm 57. When I was at Cameron University from 1978 to 1980 my data processing class used punch cards for programming entry. What did we do with them? Wrote each line of code on each card. You messed up 1 card out of 100 the compiler kicked the entire batch out. 😞 Double check each card and put your cards back in the que stack above other students...Sigh...those were the days..lol

2 days ago   ·  1

4 Replies

Avatar

Russell HallI ran a keypunch machine for a while back when I was a COBOL programmer.

2 days ago   ·  1

1 Reply

Avatar

Pamela Moore DaVoultI certainly recognize those cards; cause I punched a bunch of them! I didn't work in Duncan however. I was big time OKC for the Ok Employment Security Commission. We typed names, SS numbers & wages in 1971-72. We also had a verifyer that went over them. We had probably 15-20 machines in one room; which were nothing compared to those big ole computers they had!!

2 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Paula GaryI did this at Sunray my senior year. They also had a real switchboard! All were updated that year (1978).

2 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Janie RammingI'm that old too.

2 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

June FranksIs this the same as "mag cards"? Does anyone remember making wreaths to hang on doors out of the abundant ones that we were to throw away?

2 days ago   ·  3

4 Replies

Avatar

Pat Ivy ScottI remember these cards well. I was the first "key-punch" operator when Security National Bank was converting to computers. We used the Halliburton mainframes for a couple of years. Great times with George MacFarlane, Bob McCormick, Faith Hayes, Karla Markle and others.

2 days ago   ·  2
Pat Ivy Scott

Alta Massegee DeweyI remember these cards. We kept lists of serial numbers for our cementing manuals on these.

2 days ago   ·  1
Alta Massegee Dewey

Phil WilhelmThe first programming class I took at Oklahoma State I punched cards. One card was a line of code. I'm not sure, but it was probably in BASIC.

2 days ago   ·  1

1 Reply

Phil Wilhelm

Comment on Facebook

When I was in the 7th grade I had Mr. Bert Lana for my homeroom teacher at DJH. He promoted a Scout Camp that I ended up going to for about a week. I am pretty sure it was he who promoted it. Would anyone out there remember the name of this camp and its location? It was in OK. I remember one night we decided to sleep out in the open under the stars. Bad idea. it started raining slowly about 3am steadily building up to a full blown gullywasher. We all ran into our tents leaving the sleeping bags laying there to get soaked. It took all the next day for those sleeping bags to dry out. I remember that the scoutmaster said the next day, "boys, your body will dry out a heck of a lot faster than those sleeping bags." The next day there were dozens of sleeping bags hanging out to dry. I will never forget that. ... See MoreSee Less

Barbara Northington Bailey, Lisa Greenlee Cephus and 4 others like this

View previous comments

Peggy BeveridgeBert Lana was a very nice man.

2 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Terry WardI think it was down by Davis

2 days ago
Avatar

Marvin S WatkinsWell there is Camp Simpson. Camp Winkler just east of Duncan

2 days ago

8 Replies

Avatar

Jack VanbebberI went to one he sponsored in Arkansas.

2 days ago   ·  1

7 Replies

Avatar

Steve GronerThere was one near Ada called Slippery Falls.

2 days ago
Avatar

Jimmy L. DodsonCould have been it.

2 days ago
Jimmy L. Dodson

Allyson Kay HurleyCamp George Thomas was near Duncan. .

14 hours ago
Allyson Kay Hurley

Allyson Kay HurleyMy husband was in Boy Scouts and went there a lot. It was close to Mt Scott

14 hours ago
Allyson Kay Hurley

Comment on Facebook

I'm trying to locate Carl Tucker. He graduated in 1954. I think he won the Crossman Award. He was a good friend of my brother, Joe Crutchfield. Joe passed away on September 11, and Carl should be notified of his passing. Thank you very much. ... See MoreSee Less

Kyle Collins likes this

View previous comments

Carole ScottYou might call Kay Wallraven, her daughter owns Kay's Real Estate here in Duncan. Kay may know how to reach Carl Tucker or know someone that can help you locate him.

3 days ago

1 Reply

Avatar

Jane Matthews SkinnerSorry to hear of the loss of your brother.

3 days ago   ·  1
Jane Matthews Skinner

Kyle CollinsTell me what you know. Who were his parents ? Where he went to College or service ? Last known address.

3 days ago

8 Replies

Kyle Collins

Ross ReederSue N. Boren: I am guessing you have notified Coach Sutton. Joe had lots of stories about their college days.

3 days ago

1 Reply

Ross Reeder

Comment on Facebook

Denise Rogers Arnold
16 September at 23:17 ·

UPDATE ON "TILT-A-WHIRL JOE"
As many of you may have already heard, my dad passed away early this morning at 2:27 AM. It was a long ride for my sister and I, and a ride that we would have not changed a thing about it. It was such a blessing to get to care for him, day in and day out through his illness. He always saw the light at the end of the tunnel, always positive, always funny and encouraging to my sister and I. We are so blessed that he is in the arms of Jesus, along with our mother Mary, my daughter Amie, his nephews Tim White, Clayton Estep, his parents and his 4 brothers that have preceded him in death. We just want to thank everybody for all your prayers, calls, visits, cards, food and support through this journey.
Like
... See MoreSee Less

Karen Brown Lowe, Bobbie Campbell Rogers and 20 others like this

View previous comments

Cindy VickPrayers for comfort and peace for you and your family.

3 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Terry MorrisThanks for keeping us advised. May God bless and comfort you and your family.

3 days ago
Avatar

Jessica AustinSo sorry to hear that sad news. Prayers for your family.

3 days ago
Avatar

Dewayne BoylesPrayers of peace and comfort....

3 days ago
Avatar

Jim KlentosI saw a article about your dad on here the other day sounds like he was a good man sorry for your loss

3 days ago
Avatar

Shari 'Miller' StandridgeHe will always be a childhood memory for my kids. God bless.

3 days ago
Avatar

Twilla Cheves-HendricksPrayers for all and God Bless.

3 days ago
Avatar

Darla Strange FranklinHe blessed all that he came in contact with!

3 days ago
Avatar

Sandy Little LaneSo sorry for your loss!!

3 days ago
Avatar

Connie Duggar Aldridge HicksPRAYERS FOR ALL.

3 days ago
Avatar

Beverly Hall MurphyPrayers for your family.

3 days ago
Beverly Hall Murphy

Shirley MartinPrayers of peace.

3 days ago
Shirley Martin

Rick GriffithSo sorry for your loss. He will be missed.

2 days ago
Rick Griffith

Comment on Facebook

A great 1966 aerial of Carl Campbell Chevrolet looking West starting about from Pearl Street. The photo shows the entrance to Hudson Street on the very left side. Peters Texaco station is nearly in the middle of the picture on the East side of 81. The dark grassy island is where Baker Express Pharmacy is today. Braum’s is located where the South end of Chisholm Trail Hotel is shown in this picture. The South end of Walmart today pretty well lines up with main Chevrolet building. There is a house by itself where Walmart is today but I don’t know who owns it. (photo from the Stephens County Historical Museum). ... See MoreSee Less

A great 1966 aerial of Carl Campbell Chevrolet looking West starting about from Pearl Street. The photo shows the entrance to Hudson Street on the very left side. Peters Texaco station is nearly in the middle of the picture on the East side of 81. The dark grassy island is where Baker Express Pharmacy is today. Braum’s is located where the South end of Chisholm Trail Hotel is shown in this picture. The South end of Walmart today pretty well lines up with main Chevrolet building. There is a house by itself where Walmart is today but I don’t know who owns it. (photo from the Stephens County Historical Museum).

RIta McKinley, Kevin McGuire and 23 others like this

View previous comments

Camellia Howell FosterI use to know who owned lived in the house. maybe Whitten? they would know if no one does. whom ever it was had horses.

5 days ago
Avatar

Ron BishopBottom right hand corner is #13th green at Elks CC. Grantham's would probably know who owned house.

5 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Zeldarae Moore DavisSo did Stockman's use part of his building? Looks similar. I thought Carl Campbell was where Stockman's and Garden Town was

5 days ago

1 Reply

Avatar

Allison BryantStockman's was in the main dealership building. Garden Town was in the area just to the south of the main building.

5 days ago   ·  2
Avatar

Mary Kathryn Spurgin CookI agree about that the Whittens might know who owned that house. I think the road to it was "Whitten Rd"

5 days ago   ·  1

1 Reply

Avatar

Mike Nancy GranthamI think it was the Whittens. They farmed south down to Elk, west, and a little to the north at one time. There was a driving range south of Carl Campbell Chevy.

5 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Camellia Howell FosterWhitten owned the land but I don't think they lived down there. but it was someone we all know.

5 days ago
Avatar

Camellia Howell FosterCliff Whitten lived back there.

5 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Kyle CollinsCliff and Frances Whitten ... a farmer and trucker.

5 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Camellia Howell FosterI don't know what kin that is to Steve & butch but I use to go back there all the time and he farmed all the way to elk. now at the time that seemed like a long way. I think I bought hay there and my Dad knew him.

5 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Kyle CollinsClifford Franklin Whitten May 4, 1913 - Nov 16, 1993 Frances E. (Morris) Whitten Dec 11, 1912 - Feb 9, 2011 Married Jan 1, 1930 Parents of Ronald & Gary Whitten

5 days ago
Avatar

Camellia Howell Fosteroh yes thats where the Morris comes in. Buck Morris owned all that land. all that frontage walmart , McDonald's the strip mall etc. I did Nova Morris hair for years and she always knew when new businesses were coming in. not sure but the way Nova talked the land couldn't be sold just leased. whew we got that figured out.

5 days ago   ·  3
Avatar

Shane SchrickEmily Schrick this is what Jim was talking about.

5 days ago
Avatar

Robert Stokes BeallBack in 1966, I lived in the house in the foreground, it was the house behind the Texaco station on Hudson Street. Thanks for the photo.

Attachment5 days ago   ·  1

2 Replies

Avatar

Terry MorrisAt the very top of the picture is where the Williams West addition is now. Tommy Williams owned that land.

5 days ago
Avatar

Mark RussellTommyandMarsha Williams.....

4 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Terry MorrisI haven't heard from Tommy since he moved back to Florida. That has been a lot of years. Hope he is doing well. I sure did like him. Nice guy.

4 days ago

2 Replies

Avatar

Carol WheelerI baled hay for Cliff there I went to church with France's they were good people

4 days ago
Avatar

Danny BerryBobby Patterson didn't your dad work at Carl Campbell Chevrolet?

4 days ago   ·  1

2 Replies

Danny Berry

Bobby PattersonMy dad worked for Mr Campbell from 1958 till 1997. I was pretty much raised in that dealership.

4 days ago   ·  1
Bobby Patterson

David GaedeI was a paint & body man at Campbell Sparks about 3 years after this was taken. My wifes Dad, John Peters, owned the Texaco Service Station across the street at the bottom of the picture to the left of the Chisolm Trail Hotel . Darlene Black

3 days ago   ·  1
David Gaede

Comment on Facebook

Denise Rogers Arnold
6 September at 17:29 ·

TILT-A-WHIRL JOE" update
Dad was doing well for a
long period of time, but on 18 August he went in for a PET scan to see if his cancer had spread. As they wheeled him out in his wheelchair into the lobby of the DRH Imaging Center, my sister noticed something was not quite right, long story short he had a stroke while finishing up the PET scan, it was a major stroke, we had no idea what the outcome would be, we asked for prayer and received prayers from all over. We transported him to the VA Hospital in Oklahoma City, and once again the doctors were amazed at his recovery, he was talking eating and drinking within 11 hours after his major stroke. He remained in the hospital for seven days. When we brought him home, he continued to recovered remarkably. However, approximately three days after we had him home we believe he had two if not more mini strokes, which left him totally unable to speak, except for a few short words like yes, no, hurt and water. It just seems like he got really sick, really, really fast, and I don't think he even understands what's going on, yet he does understand everything we say and ask him to do, I just don't believe he understand the severity of his illness. He is very nurse intensive at this time and yes the cancer has spread throughout his body. At this time we just ask for continued prayers to comfort him. My siblings and I have gotten to enjoy and him for so many years, along with so many children that he has given rides to on the Tilt-a- Whirl at Kiddieland. Thank you for all your prayers thank you everybody that has come by to pray with him, sent him cards, and brought food to the house. I will try to continue to give you updates. Thanks again
... See MoreSee Less

Denise Rogers Arnold 
6 September at 17:29 ·

TILT-A-WHIRL JOE update
Dad was doing well for a
long period of time, but on 18 August he went in for a PET scan to see if his cancer had spread. As they wheeled him out in his wheelchair into the lobby of the DRH Imaging Center, my sister noticed something was not quite right, long story short he had a stroke while finishing up the PET scan, it was a major stroke, we had no idea what the outcome would be, we asked for prayer and received prayers from all over. We transported him to the VA Hospital in Oklahoma City, and once again the doctors were amazed at his recovery, he was talking eating and drinking within 11 hours after his major stroke. He remained in the hospital for seven days. When we brought him home, he continued to recovered remarkably. However, approximately three days after we had him home we believe he had two if not more mini strokes, which left him totally unable to speak, except for a few short words like yes, no, hurt and water. It just seems like he got really sick, really, really fast, and I dont think he even understands whats going on, yet he does understand everything we say and ask him to do, I just dont believe he understand the severity of his illness. He is very nurse intensive at this time and yes the cancer has spread throughout his body. At this time we just ask for continued prayers to comfort him. My siblings and I have gotten to enjoy and him for so many years, along with so many children that he has given rides to on the Tilt-a- Whirl at Kiddieland. Thank you for all your prayers thank you everybody that has come by to pray with him, sent him cards, and brought food to the house. I will try to continue to give you updates. Thanks again

David Barnett, Patsy Henry and 23 others like this

View previous comments

Jean SchalitA life well lived!

2 weeks ago
Avatar

Audra Towell MaytubbyWhat a sweet heart. Praying for his comfort as well as yours. ❤

2 weeks ago   ·  1
Avatar

Sherri Resneder MiddickPrayers to the family. He is such a sweet caring man that knows how to bring joy to the kids in Stephens County. I believe he had as much fun as we did riding the Tilt A Whirl.

2 weeks ago
Avatar

Pam McCordYour dad is a sweet man.

2 weeks ago
Avatar

Don BrysonPrayers

2 weeks ago
Avatar

Lanece StewardPrayers for sure. Our kids loved him and we have special memories

2 weeks ago
Avatar

Kathy TaylorPraying for your dad and for all of you as you cope in this difficult time💙🙏💙

2 weeks ago
Avatar

Donna DodsonPraying

2 weeks ago
Avatar

Mary Kathryn Spurgin CookPrayers for all of you.

2 weeks ago
Avatar

Lisa Greenlee CephusPrayers for your dad.

2 weeks ago
Avatar

Kenneth ParkerPraying for a full recovery, there are many more generations that he needs to laugh at while giving them a ride on the Tilt-A-Whirl.

2 weeks ago   ·  2
Avatar

Terry Baugh BurdinePrayers! Love that man! Lots of good memories when I was a kid and my kids got to enjoy him too! Truly blessed to know him!

2 weeks ago
Avatar

Annie BennettPraying for him. He was so sweet to all the kids at Kiddieland.

2 weeks ago
Avatar

Nancy Acridge CisnerosSending prayers! God bless him for all the years of joy he has brought to so many people!

2 weeks ago
Avatar

Vonda HarwellHe always seemed to have such fun "gunning it" for the kids! He must have as much fun running its the kids do riding. We are praying for your daddy , Denise.

2 weeks ago
Avatar

Karli RayI remember him he was great!

2 weeks ago
Avatar

Verna Lee PettigrewSuch a joy to all, prayers!

2 weeks ago
Avatar

Elizabeth Pitts-HibbardIs there anything we can do to help?

2 weeks ago
Avatar

Sharon Sue Srygley Herndon🙏🏻

2 weeks ago
Avatar

Grace LanePrayers for ALL of you .

2 weeks ago
Avatar

Rick CanoyPrayers for peace and comfort for your dad and family.

2 weeks ago
Avatar

Chris OldsSending prayers love and loads of hugs....

2 weeks ago
Avatar

Ron SmithGod bless

2 weeks ago
Ron Smith

Judy HarperPraying & God Bless You All! He loves the Tilt-A-Whirl & we all loved him!

2 weeks ago
Judy Harper

Connie Holman RobinsonSending prayers

2 weeks ago
Connie Holman Robinson

Comment on Facebook

Does anyone know where this is located in Duncan or what it is? ... See MoreSee Less

Does anyone know where this is located in Duncan or what it is?

Sheila Mclendon, Pat Gray and 6 others like this

View previous comments

Verna Phelps Johnsagree, but it's painted red now!!!

2 weeks ago   ·  1
Avatar

Pamela Moore DaVoultIn the rural paper, last months photo was in Duncan. It was the old Patterson bldg. On Willow.

2 weeks ago

3 Replies

Avatar

Gail TonkinsonThe Oklahoma Living has it in Duncan Okla

2 weeks ago
Avatar

Pamela Moore DaVoultNo, doesn't it say last months photo was in Duncan?

2 weeks ago
Avatar

Gail TonkinsonYes my husband showed it to me and I assumed it was for this pic. You know what happens when you assume. Thanks Ernie

2 weeks ago   ·  2
Avatar

Rita HackThere is an old church in Duncan that looks like that. People called it the barrel church. I think it's on South 5th and willow

2 weeks ago
Avatar

Pamela Moore DaVoultWell, I tried to win the $25. That's why I recognized it.

2 weeks ago
Avatar

Gail TonkinsonOk it's in Arcadia this month go for it

2 weeks ago
Avatar

Rita HackI've been to the red barn in Arcadia. This is an old pic.

2 weeks ago
Avatar

Judy KellerThis is in Arcadia. It is a red barn now.

2 weeks ago
Avatar

Pat GrayIts a barn, but I dont think its in Arcadia

2 weeks ago   ·  2
Avatar

Tommie MartinJamestown Va.

2 weeks ago
Avatar

Cathey Stuart YoungWasn't this a dairy way back when?

2 weeks ago
Avatar

Sheila MclendonLooks like Wright's steak house to me

2 weeks ago

1 Reply

Sheila Mclendon

Craig LovettThe photo is the Hines Round Barn in Sallisaw, Oklahoma. It was built in 1913 for W.R. Hines. It is still standing, but no longer has a roof. Google "round barn Sallisaw Ok"

2 days ago
Craig Lovett

Keith Berry

Attachment2 days ago   ·  1
Keith Berry

Comment on Facebook

The Daily Oklahoman newspaper. Caption: "1957 TEACHER OF THE YEAR in Oklahoma is Mrs. Helen White, Duncan, whose 52-years teaching - 35 of them in Emerson school's first grade-are "happy years," she says." Helen White retired in 1964 after the "new" Emerson school was built. A total of 42 years at Emerson school. ... See MoreSee Less

The Daily Oklahoman newspaper. Caption: 1957 TEACHER OF THE YEAR in Oklahoma is Mrs. Helen White, Duncan, whose 52-years teaching - 35 of them in Emerson schools first grade-are happy years, she says. Helen White retired in 1964 after the new Emerson school was built. A total of 42 years at Emerson school.

Janice Hendricks, Sharla Reed-Cox and 23 others like this

View previous comments

Philip Russell-WorrellRecognized her immeduately, but I had Mrs. Hassler for 1st grade at Emerson.

5 months ago
Avatar

Marsha Fenter BolayI loved her!!! Her husband was really nice too. They lived next door to my Aunt and cousins right across the street from Emerson School.

5 months ago   ·  1
Avatar

Marsha Fenter BolaySandra Gigoux Gentry and Karen Cochran

5 months ago   ·  1
Avatar

Caron Hawkinssweet!

5 months ago
Avatar

Janice Kay Dixon BeasleyShe was my 1st grade teacher

5 months ago
Avatar

Charles BentleyMy first grade teacher.

5 months ago   ·  1
Avatar

Nancy Frensley StorrieMy Dad had her in first grade and I had her also in first grade. Great teacher !

5 months ago   ·  3
Avatar

Gary ByromMy first grade teacher..a lovely lady

5 months ago   ·  2
Avatar

Beverly LivelyMy first grade teacher! I loved her!

5 months ago   ·  2
Avatar

Glenda Chapelle Hamiltonmy brother had Mrs. White at Emerson, I had Mrs Tunnell

5 months ago
Avatar

Elizabeth K. Allen OverstreetI had Mrs Hassler too. I always thought Mrs White was so sweet.

5 months ago

2 Replies

Avatar

Debra Beck BryantMy first grade teacher!

5 months ago   ·  2
Avatar

Ann HartMy first grade teacher too! Mrs. white also taught my husbands mom and her sister.

5 months ago   ·  2
Avatar

Kathy RyleI loved Mrs.White

5 months ago
Avatar

Ferrell MitchussonI loved Mrs. White!

5 months ago
Avatar

Vanessa Thomas DuranMy first grade teacher also. She made an impression on my little mind.

5 months ago   ·  2
Avatar

Midge Choat GerberShe was my first grade teacher at Emerson. She was just our size. Loved her.

5 months ago
Avatar

Beverly Kirk PateShe was also my Sunday school teacher.

5 months ago   ·  3
Avatar

Cassa Dennis GoodShe was a cousin to my grandmother. I was across the hall in Mrs. DeSilva's room.

5 months ago

3 Replies

Avatar

Robbie Pruitt SimmondsLoved Mrs White!! My first grade teacher!!

5 months ago   ·  1
Avatar

Jan Bennett GillespieI can still see her sweet face. She told me everyday not run in the halls and then she'd pat me on top of the head...

5 months ago   ·  1
Avatar

Patti Green YatesMy first grade teacher too!!

5 months ago
Avatar

Cathy Cherry CollierAwww!!! Love this!!! Mrs. White was my first grade teacher!!! This is exactly how I remember her!!! No surprise that she received this honor!!!

5 months ago
Cathy Cherry Collier

John EstesMy wife found the trophy pictured above under the stage at Emerson School. Mrs. White went to church with my family as was my Sunday school teacher in my early years. Sweet lady!!

4 months ago   ·  4
John Estes

Thala PottsShe was my favorite!!! Robbie got sent to the hall more than me. Lol

4 months ago   ·  1

1 Reply

Thala Potts

Comment on Facebook

Anyone eat meat from Ridley Packing Co. ??? Photo taken around 1980. Photo of the Ridley Brothers just below. (photo from the Stephens County Historical Museum). ... See MoreSee Less

Anyone eat meat from Ridley Packing Co. ??? Photo taken around 1980. Photo of the Ridley Brothers just below. (photo from the Stephens County Historical Museum).

Vicki Malone, Esther Sanchez-champion and 23 others like this

View previous comments

Kyle CollinsDavid Murillo

1 years ago
Avatar

Kyle CollinsThe Ridley Brothers ... Bruce, Glenn, Dave, Ray, and Bill.

Attachment1 years ago   ·  16

3 Replies

Avatar

Lou SheffieldI attended church with the Ridley brothers.

1 years ago   ·  3
Avatar

John SlateRidley's meat market in Duncan is still the best around

1 years ago   ·  7
Avatar

Philip FletcherI drove a truck for them in the late 70s and early 80s. Hated to see they went out of business.

1 years ago   ·  1
Avatar

Sherry SessumsMy uncle worked there

1 years ago   ·  1
Avatar

Brook RidleyThanks for the memories, Kyle Collins!

1 years ago   ·  8
Avatar

Rayma Steelman PinneyYes best meat anywhere. My Dad owned a grocery store when I was in High School and got all his meat there. I made many trips out there for a side of beef, without a drivers license I might add, he had people drive across town for his meat.

1 years ago   ·  5

2 Replies

Avatar

Neil RosserWas in band w Russell Ridley from 4th grade to junior year in HS, class of 1980.

1 years ago
Avatar

Henry B. PickardWorked there for a summer in '77! What an education that was!

1 years ago   ·  2
Avatar

Johnny MooreI was raised about 2 blocks from the Ridley Packing Plant. Lots of memories. I smoked my first cigar behind the plant, at a very early age. I think I turned green. In high school, we would often cut class on Friday to work at Ridley's "pulling hides". We would only do this in the winter when everything was frozen. In the summer, you could not stand the stench. The hides were laid out on top of each other and stored for a time in a large room. When the room was full, laborers would pull up the hides and drag them to a folding and salting table. There they would be tied in a bundle and loaded in a semi trailer. $20 a day. That was good money in those days.

1 years ago   ·  4

1 Reply

Avatar

Jeff BurkI remember the smell

1 years ago
Avatar

Lisa ClinkinbeardMy dad work there until they closed down I learned to drive down there dad fed stock on weekends was there where stock came in on weekends also

1 years ago

5 Replies

Avatar

Bob ThomasIn the early '70's my m-I-law would drive from Marlow to Ridley's to get her meat to make B-B-Q she sold from cafe.

1 years ago
Avatar

Russell ColeThey took us there for a field trip in like 3rd grade or such. As we got on the bus to back to school, they had an open box of wieners (hotdogs) so we could eat it on the way back. After seeing th dumpsters full of body parts they made the dogs with, only one other kid and myself took one. :D :D :D

1 years ago   ·  5
Avatar

Lorraine Garrison CrabbThey made the best chili!

1 years ago   ·  1

5 Replies

Avatar

Dana LockeThey made the best red Weiner's for hot dogs...we knew what was in them but oh well they tasted better than any of the others...

1 years ago   ·  1
Avatar

Michael FullertonI remember taking FFA field trips.

1 years ago   ·  1
Avatar

Cindy OvertonCould hear livestock from my house. Felt like I lived on a farm. Glad I didn't realize what was going on!

1 years ago
Avatar

Chris Kara McdanielI don't know what is in this building now but I think it would have made a really cool steak house!

1 years ago   ·  2
Avatar

Susan BraselTheir sign in brick bothered me for years until I realized the 'N' that is under the 'L' was backwards.

1 years ago   ·  1
Avatar

Johnny MooreThey also made some great Mexican Hot Links. I could buy one at Murfs Redwood Market for a nickel.

1 years ago   ·  3
Avatar

Dana LockeI remember those hot links...my mom had an account with murfs and we went and got lots of good stuff...

1 years ago   ·  1
Dana Locke

Jacky Price MooreMy daddy worked there too

1 years ago   ·  3
Jacky Price Moore

Rachel Robinson PerdueYes, just everybody did!

1 years ago
Rachel Robinson Perdue

Comment on Facebook

A rare aerial photo of the North Fifth Street Drive-In Theatre located at 505 West Elder (5th and Elder). The Drive-In was opened in about 1951 and closed about 1956. It was owned by Jack Guest, an entrepreneur who owned the Ritz Theatre in Duncan. Picture taken about 1956. (photo from the Stephens County Historical Museum). ... See MoreSee Less

A rare aerial photo of the North Fifth Street Drive-In Theatre located at 505 West Elder (5th and Elder). The Drive-In was opened in about 1951 and closed about 1956. It was owned by Jack Guest, an  entrepreneur who owned the Ritz Theatre in Duncan. Picture taken about 1956. (photo from the Stephens County Historical Museum).

Keith Pratt, Sanya Pat Steele and 23 others like this

View previous comments

Kyle CollinsTo the right center is the McCasland Shopping Center. If you know where to look .. you can ID Northside Church of Church, Emerson School, Safeway, Halliburton Statium, and bare ground where Duncan High School will be built.

1 years ago
Avatar

Kyle CollinsThe developed streets in the McCasland area are Hillcrest Drive, Highland Way, McCasland Parkway, and Normandy Road with a house or two.

1 years ago

1 Reply

Avatar

Amanda EmersonI had no idea there was ever a Drive-In there! Great picture! Thank you for posting!

1 years ago   ·  2
Avatar

Cindy Smithnever knew this, good catch!

1 years ago   ·  1
Avatar

Dale NicholsKRHD, Century Motel, Swimming pool Lindley hospital and house.

1 years ago   ·  1
Avatar

Kyle CollinsIf you can follow 10th ... I see the Lee Wade house at 1302 Highland Way in the new addition (all by itself).

1 years ago   ·  2
Avatar

Kirk CollinsInteresting pic, Bro. Never heard of that drive-in before.

1 years ago   ·  1
Avatar

Ruth Burch HobbsShort lived but I lived on N fifth 1952---56 & went to the Drive in often

1 years ago   ·  4
Avatar

Lonna Lawson AyresWe moved out on 5th street in 1952 and I remember going there and passing it everyday going home. I know it was gone by the time I was in the 10th grade and I graduated in 1960. If I remember right it was less parking than the Duncan Drive In. That was country when we moved out there. Not any more, stopped to see our place when I was home in 2005. Drove by it last year while there for our reunion.

1 years ago   ·  3
Avatar

Glyndal Dairon CowanMy Dad took us there when we were kids. Probably had to be carload night cause money was tight!

1 years ago
Avatar

Sean ConnerI'm trying to place that-whats in that spot now?

1 years ago

2 Replies

Avatar

Kyle CollinsA more current look of the old drive-in that laid behind businesses along Elder Ave.

Attachment1 years ago   ·  1
Avatar

June ChamblessI have vague memories of driving by it but I doubt we ever went there. I do have memories of going to the other two as a young child. What was the name of the one on 5th & Elder?

1 years ago

2 Replies

Avatar

Myrlene HopkinsWe lived next door to them. My parents worked at the drive in after my Dad came home from Halliburton.

1 years ago   ·  1
Avatar

Barbara CarterThey use to call these the good ole day....lol

1 years ago
Avatar

Barbara CarterSimpler times all you had to think about is the work at hand for the day....family & friends in the evening and a good nights rest. We didn't have all this tv junk to watch and to keep us (so called informed) that puts panic in our hearts and lives today.

1 years ago   ·  1
Avatar

Nancy Acridge CisnerosRight on the corner?

1 years ago
Avatar

Dale NicholsThe trains had to hoot twice for the crossing, but they seemed to put a special ooomph1 in it when something good was on the screen.

1 years ago   ·  3
Avatar

Rick LoveThat first picture shows the new McCasland development and the shopping center. The circle drive in the lower center is where Normandy Court finally had the Anderson's the Loves, The Knox family and the Speegle's . Thanks for sharing this photo.

1 years ago   ·  2

1 Reply

Avatar

June ChamblessDid Northside CoC have a different style of building prior to the white brick there now?

1 years ago

5 Replies

Avatar

Mutt A RoseDrive-Inn on Elder? I thought the location was Plato Road at Hwy 81. Boy, my mind is slipping....

3 weeks ago
Avatar

Lou KnottYeah, there too, Mutt A Rose, but later.

3 weeks ago
Avatar

Mike Nancy GranthamGreat aerial pic. Shows McCasland Center.

3 weeks ago   ·  1
Mike Nancy Grantham

Mike Nancy GranthamWeren't they rebuilding Lindley Hospital after the fire then. I can't enlarge the picture enough to tell. Or was this pic before the fire?

3 weeks ago

3 Replies

Mike Nancy Grantham

Mike GilbertI lived 2 blocks from there. We would climb up on the old screen after the drive in was closed down. There would be a fireworks stand on the se corner some Julys In the early 60s or late 50s.

3 weeks ago   ·  3
Mike Gilbert

Comment on Facebook

The Custom Facebook Feed plugin

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Time limit exceeded. Please complete the captcha once again.